The Development of Neuro Cognitive Systems Underpinning Callous Unemotional Traits and Antisocial Behavior (James Blair PhD)

The Development of Neuro Cognitive Systems Underpinning Callous Unemotional Traits and Antisocial Behavior (James Blair PhD)

Project Description

James Blair, Ph.D. is Chief of the Unit on Affective Cognitive Neuroscience in the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program of the National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program. Dr. Blair received a doctoral degree in Psychology from University College London in 1993 under the supervision of Professor John Morton.  Following graduation he was awarded a Wellcome Trust Mental Health Research Fellowship that he held at the Medical Research Council Cognitive Development Unit for three years.  Subsequently, Dr. Blair moved to the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London.  There, with Uta Frith, he helped form and co-lead the Developmental Disorders group, and was ultimately appointed Senior Lecturer. Dr. Blair Joined the NIMH Intramural Research Program in 2002. Dr. Blair’s primary research interest involves understanding the neuro-cognitive systems mediating affect in humans and how these become dysfunctional in mood and anxiety disorders. His primary clinical focus is in understanding the dysfunction of affect-related systems in youth with specific forms of conduct disorder. His research approach includes techniques employed in cognitive neuroscience (both neuropsychology and functional imaging), psychopharmacology and, more recently, molecular genetics.  Populations studied include both healthy adolescents and adults as well patients with psychopathy, acquired sociopathy, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Slides for this video can be found here.